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Cornell University

  1. Cornell University Invented a Bike You Can’t Steer… For Science?

    Congratulations, we guess?

    Meet the "Bricycle" -- a modified bicycle built by Cornell University engineers to test what it would be like to ride a bike in zero gravity. What they found is that although we blame gravity when we fall off a bike, without it, you'd be unable to steer.

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  2. According To This Mathematical Model, Facebook Will Lose 80% Of Its Followers In The Next Few Years

    Nowhere does the paper mention what effect that moms joining Facebook has on the population.

    Facebook's reckoning is any day now, we expect. Oh, sure, they claim to have reached over 1.1 billion people since May of last year, but we're all getting tired of it, right? Two engineers from Princeton University think the site has peaked and will probably see a rapid decrease in users, and they've got the math to back up their claim.

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  3. This Software Looks At Your Face, Knows Your Name

    My brother John just has that John look about him. He's just got that...you know, weird John look. Could you tell looking at him? I don't know, probably not. (And I wouldn't recommend it.) But you know what probably could? New software, created at Cornell University, can take a look at your face and take an educated guess on what your name is. That's right, it's profiling you. Because it's not enough to empower robots with cloud intelligence or crime prediction -- now we're letting them collect our faces. What can go wrong?

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  4. 3D Printing and Bioengineering Work Together to Print a Working Human Ear

    3D printing has brought us all sorts of neat household gadgets and delightful statuettes and toys, but the real advances made possible by the technology might not be in the home, but in the lab. Take, for example, this replacement human ear, engineered from rat tail cells and cow cartilage and given shape in a 3D printed mold of a patient's own ear.

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  5. Smile And Say AAAAHHH: Hacked Pepper Spray Will Take a Snapshot of Your Mugger

    Being pepper-sprayed is a deeply unpleasant experience, which is why in a perfect world, it's usually reserved to people who are trying to mug, rape, or otherwise assault someone. And if someone is trying to pull that sort of crap on you, you don't want to just hose them down with capsicum. You want to put their ass behind bars where they belong, and to do that, you'll need a good description of your assailant.  A team of students at Cornell University though, want to do you one better, which is why they're developing a miniature camera that can be paired with a can of pepper spray to snap a picture of the perpetrator while you're sending them high-tailing with your self-defense spray.

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  6. Researchers Create Transforming DNA-Based Gel That Remembers Its Shape, Returns To It

    A team of researchers at Cornell University have created a gel built from synthetic DNA that remembers its own shape, and can return to that form after being reduced to a free-flowing, formless goo. Researchers are studying the gel to learn more about its potential as a drug delivery system, which, to our minds, really sells short its obvious future making those little sponge dinosaurs totally obsolete and replacing them with staggeringly detailed hydrogel statues. Get on it, science!

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  7. New Breed of Flying Robot Sees and Avoids Obstacles With Real Time 3D Vision

    Researchers at Cornell University working on a grant from DARPA have crafted a quadrocopter robot that can navigate around obstacles in real-time using a new type of 3D vision. This autonomous vision could pave the way for flying rescue robots that don't have to be controlled by humans and can enter caves or broken-down buildings and navigate on their own. Of course, it also paves the way for flying murderbots that can see us wherever we hide and means no place will ever be safe again, but, you know, you take the good with the bad.

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  8. Math Journal Accepts Nonsense Paper Generated by Computer Program

    Don't worry if the above title looks like a bunch of gibberish to you. The terms are all related to advanced mathematics, so you can't be blamed for not really understanding it. Oh, and also, it's randomly generated nonsense -- grammatically accurate sentences penned by a computer program that have no mathematical merit, so seriously, don't feel bad if it doesn't make sense to you. You know who should feel bad, though? The person at the open access math journal Advances in Pure Mathematics who accepted this paper for publication. That's cause to feel significantly chagrinned.

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  9. Algorithm Can Solve 10,000 Piece Jigsaw in 24 Hours

    It what will surely be heralded as the beginning of the end, Andrew Gallagher at Cornell University has crafted a computer algorithm that can solve a 10,000 piece jigsaw puzzle in 24 hours. That's nearly 7,000 pieces above last year's record.

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  10. Robot Shoots Baskets, Makes Bullseyes Without Hands or Anything Even Like Hands

    A team of clever robotics-minded folks from Cornell University and the University of Chicago have demonstrated a truly novel way for robots to interact with the world around them. Their "Positive Pressure Universal Gripper" can pick up and toss an object of just about any shape without the need for pesky and complex hands. Instead, their gripper uses a robotic arm with -- no kidding -- a balloon.

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