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  1. Women Making a Name For Themselves in Funeral Industry

    It's A World of Laughter A World of Tears

    The general image of people -- men and women -- who work in the funeral industry, dealing with the dead and their surviving families, is generally a dark one. After all, don't you need a certain brand of, um, weirdness to want to spend your waking hours preparing corpses for burial or discussing "final arrangements" with the grief-stricken? Women who work in the field want to change the public's perception of the whole "Queen of the Dead" idea and have started up a social network for women in the funeral industry to show that theirs is just another career. Nothing to be icked out about.

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  2. Dell Executive Says iPad Will Fail in the Business World

    Dude: Dell's global head of marketing Andy Lark has Apple fans in a furor over his recent dismissive remarks about Apple's future in the tablet market that it more or less created. Lark, speaking to CIO.com: "Apple is great if you’ve got a lot of money and live on an island. It’s not so great if you have to exist in a diverse, open, connected enterprise; simple things become quite complex." Per Lark, Dell is the company that is poised to win the enterprise market in the long run because "the majority of [Dell's] business isn’t in the consumer space." Apple fans might laugh this away, but it's plausible enough:

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  3. CEOs With Daughters Pay Their Female Employees Better

    million dollar lady

    We observe that when a daughter was born to a male CEO, wages paid to the CEO's female employees rose relative to the wages paid to male employees. The effect was stronger for the first daughter, and stronger still if the first daughter was also the first child. The birth of a daughter to a male CEO particularly benefitted women who were more educated or who worked for smaller firms. Excerpted from "Like Daughter, Like Father: How Women's Wages Change When CEOs Have Daughters." (Bakadesuyo via The Atlantic.)

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