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Boeing

  1. Congressmen Make Transparent Attempt to Bog Down SpaceX With Transparency Request

    "You can't take the sky from me!" -Elon Musk, probably.

    We've been pretty excited about SpaceX lately with their Falcon 9 rocket launches and landings, the Dragon V2 crew module, and their new spaceport in Texas, but some members of congress don't share our enthusiasm. Three members of congress in particular are trying to put unnecessary road blocks in front of SpaceX for their own interests. Maybe no one told them that where SpaceX is going, they don't need roads?

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  2. Boeing Using Old Shuttle Hangars To House Secret Military Space Planes, Which Are A Real Thing

    Oh, don't worry, they're probably just taking nature photos or something.

    Since the US Space Shuttle program is now defunct, NASA has had to find a new use for all those shuttle hangars (other than filling them with the tears of space-lovers from across the country). Boeing's stepped in, and will be converting a hangar at Florida's Kennedy Space Center to support all those secret Air Force space planes.

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  3. NASA-Designed Hybrid Wing Uses Half the Fuel of a Normal Plane, Could be Twice as Awesome

    There's been a lot of focus on hybrid cars in the last few years, but what about other modes of transportation? A team of NASA engineers have shown a new manufacturing method for their "hybrid-wing" design that might cut fuel consumption in half. NASA estimates it could be 20 years before the new production method becomes commercially available, but the technology could begin to help improve conventional aircraft much sooner. Maybe they could use it to fix the battery on the 787?

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  4. Boeing Uses Potatoes as Human Substitutes to Test Wi-Fi

    Wi-Fi on airplanes is great as an idea, but the sad reality is that W-Fi on airplanes is actually terrible. Anyone who tries to connect their device to an in-flight Wi-Fi connection is in for a spotty, frustratingly slow experience, and as more people start using Wi-Fi enabled devices, it's only going to get worse. Boeing wants to improve in-flight Wi-Fi, so they've begun a new process for testing signal strength using sacks of potatoes as stand-ins for humans. Makes sense. As far as most airlines are concerned, we're all just sacks of potatoes anyway.

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  5. NASA Invests Over $1.1 Billion in Commercial Space Flight

    The last shuttle launch drew more than its fair share of tears. For many Americans, the shuttle program was essentially what defined "space" in their minds. With that part of the nation's history over, NASA is looking at the commercial space industry for development. Between the Sierra Nevada Corporation, Boeing, and SpaceX, NASA has awarded over $1.1 billion to further explore commercial spaceflight.

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  6. Boeing’s Commercial Spaceship Passes Parachute Test

    While SpaceX may be leading the headlines as a leader in the commercial space sector, they aren't the only ones working with NASA to build next generation spaceships. Boeing, that venerable aeronautics company, has thrown its hat in as well with its CST-100 capsule. This past Wednesday, the parachutes designed to bring the spaceship safely to the ground passed a critical test in the Nevada desert.

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  7. How the United States Will Return to Space

    On July 21, the Space Shuttle Atlantis landed for the last time, ending three decades of missions in space. With the conclusion of the Shuttle program, the quest to restore the United States' ability to send astronauts beyond the Earth became far more urgent. Though NASA has been working on a new vehicle since 2004, it also began supporting a number of home-grown commercial space operations. As part of the Commercial Crew Development initiative, four companies have started work on spacecraft that will eventually carry astronauts to the International Space Station -- and perhaps beyond.

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  8. Engineer Deliberately Crashes Car to Save Other Driver’s Life

    A remarkable thing happened in the Seattle area earlier this week: When a Boeing engineer named Duane Innes was driving to a baseball game, he saw a pickup truck driving erratically, with the driver slumped over the wheel. With the truck barreling towards a busy intersection, Innes used "basic physics" to save the life of the other driver, who turned out to be an 80-year-old man passed out due to circulatory problems.

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