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Archaeology

  1. Museum Officials Admit to Gluing King Tut’s Beard Back On, Damaging It With Spatula

    This is why we can't have nice pharaohs.

    According to the Associated Press, the 3,300-year-old burial mask of pharaoh Tutankhamun, one of the most prized artifacts at the at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo, was irreversibly damaged last year during a bout of overzealous spatulating.

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  2. Bow Down: Archaeologists Discover Tomb of Previously Unknown Pharaonic Queen

    The 3rd Khentakawess, but first in our hearts.

    Czech archaeologists have unearthed a tomb in Egypt belonging to a queen who ruled 4,500 years ago.

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  3. The Medieval Ages Were F****** Terrible: Skeleton Found With Stake Through Chest In “Vampire Grave”

    Modern vampires have it so easy.

    Spoopy news for anyone who romanticizes Ye Olden Times: an ancient skeleton has been discovered in a Bulgarian "vampire grave" with an iron ploughshare hammered through its chest.

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  4. Archaeologists Have Unearthed a Dungeon They Believe Held Vlad the Impaler (AKA Dracula) Just in Time for Halloween

    Who's up for a field trip?

    It's monster season! But how do archaeologists on a restoration effort at a creepy abandoned castle get involved in the Halloween fun—aside from the fact that their work location is basically a Scooby Doo set? Why, they uncover the dungeon that likely held the man who was part of the inspiration for Dracula, of course!

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  5. Rats May Be off the Hook for that Whole “Spreading the Plague” Thing Thanks to New Research

    Good. Splinter needed a win.

    Rats have a bad reputation despite being adorable, intelligent, and proficient in the secret art of ninja. That might have something to do with the fact that rats and their fleas took the blame for the spread of the Black Plague in the 14th century, but new research may exhonorate them. Forensic scientists now say the plague infection was airborne.

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  6. Archaeologists Discover 2,600-Year-Old “Warrior Prince” That’s Actually a Warrior Princess

    Great Hera!

    Did you think I wouldn't use a Xena picture for this post? Did you really?

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  7. World’s Oldest Board Game Found in Turkey

    Turns out Monopoly is not the world's oldest board game, just the board game for the world's oldest people.

    Archeologists have the coolest job pretty much ever. It's not all accidentally bringing mummies back to life, fighting Nazis, or stopping evil cults, but even the real-life ones make really cool discoveries. Recently, a team of archaeologists found what they believe to be the world's oldest game in a 5,000 year old Bronze Age burial site in Turkey.

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  8. Science Says: People Buried Vampires, Tyrannosaurs Hunted Prey

    And Now For Something Completely Different

    Today in part seven of our ongoing series Things People Dug Out of the Ground, new evidence of Slavic vampire burial practices and proof that Tyrannosaurus rex wasn't the cowardly scavenger that know it all little kid tried to convince you it was back in the third grade.

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  9. Iron Age Medicine Tablets Among Treasures From Ancient Shipwreck

    Researchers sifting through the artifacts of a 2,000-year-old shipwreck have uncovered an unexpected treasure --  one not of gold or silver, but simple, unassuming zinc. A tin full of zinc tablets contained within the wreck may be one of the earliest examples of a modern, prepared medicinal compound, say researchers in a story published this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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  10. North Korea Finds Ancient Unicorn Lair, Because Sure, Why Not

    Continuing their proud nation's great tradition of being simultaneously wackier and sadder than all other nations, North Korean archaeologists have announced the discovery of what they claim is the lair of a unicorn. What, you may ask, could lead them to believe they had stumbled on such an incredible find? According to the country's state run news service "A rectangular rock carved with words "Unicorn Lair" stands in front of the lair." I think you'll agree -- pretty hard to argue with evidence like that.

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