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What's with the name?

Allow us to explain.

BAD IDEAS FROM SMART PEOPLE

UPDATED: Pretty Soon You’ll Need To Pay For Cable To Use Hulu


Bad news, Hulu users. It was revealed today that the streaming service is taking the first steps toward making you prove you are a pay-TV customer before being able to watch anything. Please don’t throw anything at your computer monitor, you still need it to read The Mary Sue. Editor’s note: We have some updated information on this news after the jump.

Hulu provides ad-supported content in the way of clips and full television shows and films to users. They also proved a paid subscriction service that still has ads but with more content. They also recently started airing original programming. But according to a NY Post report, Hulu is moving toward an “authentication” model. In other words, you’ll already have to have a cable television subscription in order to use the service.

This is not pleasant news to many who have purposely cancelled their cable services to go full streaming or to use other subscription services. Not all networks stream their content online but for those that do, the content is usually just ad supported.

The NY Post writes, “In fact, the move by Hulu toward the new model — called authentication because viewers would have to log in with their cable or satellite TV account number — was behind the move last week by Providence Equity Partners to cash out of Hulu after five years, these sources said.” This is similar to how the HBO Go app works now but Hulu is not the only one that will be making this move down the road.

“Fox, owned by News Corp., which also owns The Post, is expected to begin talks soon with Comcast on a TV Everywhere deal that will require authentication. Plus, Philadelphia-based Comcast is expected to switch to an authentication model for this summer’s Olympic Games,” they write.

“Hulu, owned by News Corp., Disney, Comcast and Providence, could see its March audience [31 million visitors], as measured by ComScore, shrink after authentication. Hulu racked up some $420 million in ad revenue last year and is expected to do well in this year’s ad negotiations,” they write. “But the move toward authentication, which could take years to complete, will make cable companies happy because it could slow cord-cutting by making cable subscribing more attractive.”

That doesn’t make this reveal any easier on current Hulu users. Adam Skoglund wrote on Twitter, “Just read the #Hulu news for today. Nice to see the TV giants changing things to keep their feet firmly planted in 1997. Good luck w/ that.” IGN writer Joey Esposito has similarly negative sentiments about the news, “I swear, it’s like TV doesn’t WANT me to watch it. @Hulu #RIP”

Some have admitted they knew this would happen eventually while others called it an act of desperation. What I think might happen as a result of an authentication model is viewers getting desperate. Hulu is a free and legal service, forcing people to pay, especially if it’s not going to Hulu itself, could lead to some resorting to illegal means to procure shows. The other thing to consider is the legality of making someone subscribe to a cable provider in order to watch something from, let’s say, NBC, which is free to begin with.

So far there’s no comment from Hulu. What’s your opinion on the upcoming change and what are your regular viewing habits?

UPDATE: Techcrunch has gotten a bit more information from “a source close to Hulu.”

We just talked to a source close to Hulu. According to our source, Hulu and its content providers have talked about this move toward authentication since 2009. Our source noted that Hulu has no interest in being a first mover here and that a requirement for authentication is likely still a few years out. Hulu, however, does want to be a good partner and may have to give in to its partners’ pressure soon or later. Even though an authentication requirement isn’t likely to happen right away, though, our source notes that what could happen relatively soon is that the content providers could require longer delays before their shows become available on the service for non-subscribers. Cable subscribers, under this model, would get access to a show on Hulu the next day, while non-subscribers would have to wait at least 30 days. This model would likely also apply to Hulu Plus subscribers.

Does this make you feel any different about the news?

(via NY Post)

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  • http://twitter.com/Super_Christina Christina McTighe

    You know, I do my best to be a law-abiding sort of person. I use Hulu and Netflix, I use the library or the bookstore or iTunes. I don’t pirate things. I do my best to be the kind of contributor to the economy and society that I want other people to be. 

    This is just stupid. It’s like they want me to steal things. I don’t WANT to steal things. I just want to be able to watch The Only Way is Essex all Sunday while in my pajamas, eating popsicles. Why do they want to take that away from me? 

  • http://twitter.com/WanderinDreamr Helen the Dreamer

    As someone who mostly uses Hulu to watch anime I’m a bit confused, I don’t have cable but since my anime wouldn’t be airing on any cable stations anyway will I still need an authentication number? And what about families that have cable yet everyone has their own hulu account for keeping favorites and such separate, are we going to have to do like Netflix now and just juggle three or five people all trying to use the same account to watch stuff?

    In the end it just seems really stupid, Hulu succeeded because it was free streaming+a few minutes of ads for programming, something no one else has really succeeded in doing yet, so why do they think everyone is going to stick around after they change that?

  • http://zadl.org/ Captain ZADL

    Screw ‘em. I will never pay for a 20th century viewing experience again. If that means stealing, then I’ll steal. 

  • http://twitter.com/PhysicistLisa Lisa M

    i’ve never understood why commericals that i can skip now that i have a dvr (or ar long breaks that i used to get up during before DVRs) are considered a better method for advertising than a 30 clip (which i always watch because it’s short) that can be catered specifically to me.  I think there’s been many, many balls dropped here in advertising land. if they were really trying adapt with technology, they could be advertising in a much more profitable way. instead they just keep letting the giants at the cable companies win. All this is going to do is convince me to pirate stuff again. 

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/F6WDMXYFH6S5NTOYGNP6WPXGFA Sarah

    Noooooo! I am one of those: “we don’t need cable, we have the internet” folks! *cries*

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000980670617 Rebecca Ramsey

    If Hulu makes this move (they could still reverse directions) then I will stop using Hulu. This is backwards thinking. The networks should be moving all cable services to online platforms and streaming them to customer TV cable boxes or computers, not trying to force users who decided NOT to pay for cable and to enjoy ad-based or low-subscription-based or pay-for-view services (like Amazon/Itunes) to subscribe in order to view video content. This is why I didn’t get to see Game of Thrones until the DVDs came out. In an age of online-line video, we are not going to pay 45 dollars to have access to ALL THE CHANNELS YOU WILL NEVER WATCH. 

  • Shurree Clouse

    What about those of us who have a Hulu Plus account? When TimeWarner moved into the neighborhood, my bill went up $30.00 for the same service, causing me to call it quits with the cable company. I have no intention for going back to paying for cable so that I can watch the same re-runs of Friends and Food Network programing day after day.

    If these new “authentication” rules apply to those of us with a Plus account, my guess is that something else will pop up in Hulu’s stead. Or, consumers need to cry out against this service, much like people did when Netflix announced its Qwikster madness (course, they only listened for so long, but that’s another story).

    Surely the FCC would need to investigate the legality of all this, much like the article author said.

  • Bronwyn Mroz

     This is ridiculous.  I wouldn’t even know my cable number as it’s provided through the apartment complex I live in.  I love hulu.  I no longer have to tape shows because they’re available online pretty quickly.  It’s so much more convenient.  Way to make things more complicated and ridiculous.  Especially since, as you pointed out, not all the channels hulu streams are even channels you have to pay for!

  • http://ipstenu.org Mika “Ipstenu” Epstein

    Honestly I get why they want to charge, but wouldn’t it be better to offer it free to people who pay for cable and then just charge to those who don’t?

  • http://twitter.com/crlanei C. R. Lanei

    I’ll continue using legal methods to entertain myself. Prior to Netflix and Hulu there were plenty of books, music, games and websites to keep my free time full. I like having the option to pick and choose interesting new shows to watch but I can live without them too. I really don’t understand why the cable companies don’t understand that they are entertainment not life blood. Entertain me, don’t make it so painful and expensive to use that I realize I have a million other ways to spend my free time and little bit of extra cash.

  • Anonymous

    this is crap!  i pay for hulu plus.  why are they falling back on this cable model when they could be figuring out how to make more of its viewers cough up a monthly subscription fee?

  • http://twitter.com/regretfuljones regretfuljones

    If this happens Hulu will lose me as a consumer and I will not sign back up for cable. I currently use Hulu to catch up with shows I’ve missed. Most of my viewing is via Netflix or Amazon prime video, which are imperfect in that not all shows/movies they have in their inventories are available for streaming, which is how I prefer to watch–I see mention of a movie or show that sounds interesting and I queue it up. No waiting, no fuss. The plain fact is that none of the current legal models are nearly as easy as pirating. One search and a click and I can have the entire run of a series on my computer. I’d much rather watch legally of course, but the pirating option is always there, and always easier.

    The other thing is I’ve stopped feeling the need to watch something *as soon as it comes out*. Would I like to watch Game of Thrones as it airs? Sure, but I’ve also got a Netflix queue a mile long and I’m certainly not paying a hundred bucks a month on premium cable just for one or two shows.

  • shelly gallender

    That’s so so dumb. I haven’t had cable for years but Hulu has actually lured me into watching a few shows…. I’d much rather not watch TV at all again than pay for cable. Besides, I already pay my cable company for internet access. This move turns Hulu into a glorified DVR. 

  • http://blog.michellemista.com/ Michelle Mista

    This is terribly discouraging and confirms that the cable companies refuse to adapt to new models. I’d gone years without watching any television and didn’t pay for cable because I hate paying for 500 channels of crap I’m NOT AT ALL interested in. I was very happy to pay for Hulu, Netflix, etc. because I could dictate what I wanted to watch, when I wanted to watch it.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000500177841 Rachel Banzhaf

    I’m confused about where Hulu Plus is going to fall into this plan. If it’s used as an alternative to the cable subscription and either can get backlog-to-current access, I’m okay with that. If you need both to get the backlog, that’s crap. Cutting off all free viewing entirely is idiotic, as that prevents a ton of potential viewers from getting into a show in the first place! 

  • Anonymous

    Isn’t what they’re planning illegal? You can’t use my service unless you use someone else’s service? Wouldn’t this be trying to capture the market unfairly?

  • http://twitter.com/FroWillis Sarah

    My parents don’t see the point in paying for TV so they’ve never had cable. Even when we lived in Germany with 3 channels in English, we still didn’t have cable. My dad loves Hulu because it has all the old shows he loved plus he can watch it in his office. He actually doesn’t mind the ads. He’s going to be sad. 

    Considering they host most of the non-cable networks (all but CBS I think), this doesn’t make much sense to me. 

  • Francesca M

    THIS!

  • Carlos Ovalle

    Hm. We were just considering dropping cable and adding Hulu Plus to our other many entertainment options. Now I suppose we’ll just be considering dropping cable.

  • Francesca M

    Sigh. So many shows I’ll stop watching. I only pay for a handful of shows. Mad Men, Legend of Korra, Archer, Doctor Who, Top Chef. The others I watch on Hulu. And I pay for Hulu plus so I can watch it on my phone and tv (interestingly enough they look better on the phone). I’d be willing to pay more for hulu but I’m not willing to go back to cable tv. I guess they might still let us watch on the network sites? but meh. Don’t care.

  • http://twitter.com/littlefluffycat Lydia Ondrusek

    It’s not the same as not subscribing, but there’s a lowest level of cable they usually don’t tell you about. Most of the time that gets you the regular networks and a bit. If it comes down to it, ask after “basic”. 

  • John Wao

    If that’s true what would be the point? The more they create these so called alternatives to cable/satellite the more it keeps circling back to cable/satellite.

  • http://www.facebook.com/angelica.brenner Angelica Brenner

     Here’s hoping they pull a Netflix and back off this move once they see how unpopular it is. (Though how they could have expected anything /other/ than rampant unpopularity with this decision is mindboggling. I know entertainment industry head-honchos have a stereotype of being out of touch, but YEESH . . .)

  • Anonymous

    I am totally with you on this one. I watch a lot of anime too….I guess I’ll be sticking with Crunchyroll if I need an authentication number for shows that don’t air on basic or basic + cable packages here in the states. Chances are I’ll just cancel my Hulu subscription. *Sigh*

  • Anonymous

    It’s interesting to me that people feel so entitled to “free” tv entertainment.  Free television isn’t a right, and if the companies in control of the content decide they want to milk more money from the medium, it’s really up to them.  And it’s up to viewers to decide whether or not to pay and watch.  To those of us who already pay basic cable bills to be able to watch content on our televisions that other people watch for free online, it’s annoying and seems like extreme entitlement that people who bellyache about suddenly having to pay for their tv access.  In fact, it strikes me as grotesque that people are making such a big deal out of it!  If you don’t want to pay for it, great, don’t watch it!  Maybe go outside and take a walk instead, or read a book!  Free television isn’t a right and complaining about finally being asked to pay for something other people already have to pay for is just tacky.

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/DDQ2Y427QKJH3ZTQXMSLIU7J6U Mandy

    We canceled our DTV because we were literally paying 60+ to watch a single channel (the rest we watched were gone, because we had to cut costs, but there was a single channel among the 80+ they still offered on the ‘basic’ subscription that still had shows we were interested in) once our subscription was up. There’s no way we’re going to pay for Hulu, either.

    Sorry, cable — and by extension, Hulu! Learn to offer your channels ala carte / mix and match so I pay for what I watch as opposed to paying for what I will never watch — and maybe we’ll be back. 

    Or stop thinking that $100 a month is ‘a good deal’.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=501696416 Renée Johnson

    Just adding my voice that if this happens, Hulu will also lose me as a customer as I am not going back to cable.

  • Molly Jackson

    The best part of this article is that it came with an ad for Hulu Plus.

  • http://twitter.com/dgyoung3 Don Young

    HULU doesn’t understand the reason people want it; or they don’t care. People want to ditch cable HULU, this move will just delay the inevitable.

  • Cado Deveran

    But I’m paying for an internet connection, and I prefer to get all of my content online. I’ll pay for a subscription that lets me do that but I don’t see the harm in, say, offering a show for free on a limited basis, with ads, to anyone with an internet connection.

    It sounds to me that you feel entitled to have exclusive access to certain content despite a changing business and technological landscape which no longer favors the traditional delivery channels. You know what’s going to happen? A lot of people are going to decide that they won’t pay companies for this and the companies will either die or adapt. The only thing that’s yet to be determined is how fast it occurs.
    So really, I’m not seeing your point, and I don’t understand how calling your fellow consumers entitled furthers this discussion in any way. People are so quick to toss that word around. We’re consumers, we have to make demands, we have to declare what we will and will not pay for, otherwise we’ll get whatever they want to give us regardless of whether it’s in our best interest to accept it. 

    Simply not giving them our money is an option which we should exercise when relevant but that alone works too slowly for it to be viable for those of us who love various mediums which major corporations now control. We speak up or we resign ourselves to putting up with everything that is against the consumer, or we give up the things we love altogether.

  • Anonymous

    Seriously? I just canceled my Comcast acct and went straight streaming. Even built a home theater PC! If Hulu does this, I’m upping my download speed and ramping up my torrenting. I’m not going back to cable.

  • Xander Price

    It does seem a little bit like when the Hollywood studios way back in the 40′s owned the vast majority of the movie houses, they made it almost impossible for the small theater owners to get the big films of the times, and then forced them to take lesser received films along with the larger films (thus the low prices for double-features).  It seems like the television companies are expecting the end users to be the small cinema owner.  They need to keep in mind that it was this sort of thinking that led the U.S. into forming anti-trust laws.

  • http://www.facebook.com/1shewolf JoAnna Luffman

    I watch Hulu for Bleach on “date night” with my husband. Lets us hide in the bedroom with the laptop, and no kids to be quite so annoying while trying to watch the TV. Plus, with him running a micro business, we don’t exactly have a lot of money to spend – actually going out is incredibly rare for us.

    I’ll just give up the show, and find something else for us – my mom has a ton of DVDs we can watch. 

  • http://profiles.google.com/ashleysue Ashley Sue

    But this is just for cable channels, right?  I can still watch Community and Parks and Rec in peace (peace = drunk while eating funyuns).  

  • http://profiles.yahoo.com/u/DZTPQRGTPEAWJ3G4S5PLNIQ6AY Jacob J

    Yeah they are crazy to think I feel a need to watch tv. I only watch hulu on a whim and was quite satisfied after I canceled my cable permanently. I miss nothing, So I watch a couple decent shows on hulu once in a while. Now i’ll just continue what I’ve always done, read, watch my own dvds and videos, and get more things done instead of wasting time watching hulu.
    Good way to cut your own throat there, hulu.

  • Anonymous

    Ah! Anti-trust! That’s what I was trying to retrieve from my brain. Even in the current cable/satellite market, though the cable companies are supposed to allow for competition in local markets, there’s still an agreed upon separation. They must spend a lot of time trying to corral consumers.

  • http://www.facebook.com/angelica.brenner Angelica Brenner

     I’d imagine that most of the anime streaming on Hulu would also be streaming on the sites of the companies doing the localizing? I know Viz and Funimation have their own streaming sites, and several series are available on YouTube as well (like, legally, not just the “AnimeShowSeries s01e06 PART 1/3″ stuff.)

  • http://www.facebook.com/angelica.brenner Angelica Brenner

     The fuss isn’t about “everything must be free forever”, it’s about “this service was free (with an entirely optional subscription upgrade to access the non-free content) and everyone loved it but now The Man is locking a popular service to a less-popular service because they’re scared of the internet.”

    To cobble together an analogy, imagine a fun water park. The water park lets anyone swim in the big pool for free. If they want to, pool visitors can buy a special pass that allows them to swim in the pool /and/ go on the totally sweet water slides. The freebie visitors can’t use the slides, but the option to pay is always available to them.

    Now imagine the water park kicks everybody out and won’t let /any/ of them back in unless they get their home water from the same company that supplies the pool’s water.

  • http://www.thedungeoncrawl.blogspot.com/ Sean Samonas

    Fuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu…*aneurism*

  • Anonymous

    Bleach is on Crunchyroll too, although seeing older episodes requires a membership ($60/year). I’ve found it well worth it considering how many shows they have that are worth watching.

  • Travis Fischer

    Bleach is also over, so they’re gonna have to find a new show to watch anyway.

  • Anonymous

    Congratulations – they finally killed Hulu. I know the owners have been trying to sabotage it here and there, by trying to force them to charge $10 a month on XBox and the like, but this sounds like the idiot move that’ll finally break it’s spine.
    Well guess what, geniuses? Some of us will simply stop watching television, altogether. 

  • M Carlson

     That’s exactly what we did. The day Dish allows me to choose the channels I want a la carte will be the day that we sign back up with them. Until then, no way.

  • Peter Logsdon

     Isn’t this a form of collusion?

  • Anonymous

    This is awful. I have pay cable but like to stay in my room and stream. Sites already on the authentication model NEVER have my cable provider. So I pay for cable but can’t stream. It is very frustrating.

  • http://digg.com/users/OmegaWolf Silver Fang

    The new update seems a tiny bit fairer than the original.

  • Anonymous

     oh my god this comment makes me laugh/cry.  This is exactly how I feel. 

  • http://twitter.com/WanderinDreamr Helen the Dreamer

     Viz does have it’s own site but it uses the hulu player (which means whenever it licenses a show for the R1 region, such as Tiger and Bunny, Canadians can’t see it) so that would really hurt them. Funimation does have it’s own site and player where they stream stuff but the stuff on their site is sometimes different from the stuff on hulu.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1140056046 Tiffany Long Ryan

     That’s also what we did.  Were paying $115/month for DirecTV when we watched maybe 6 channels.  All that programming we can find on Hulu and Netflix for under $30/month.    We want to pay to watch what we want but not at that cost. 

    Some other people mentioned that cable networks should also adapt and offer channels a la carte.  That would be good too, but that’s like asking a PC manufacturer not to put bloatware on the computer when you buy it.  It’s just not going to happen.

  • Anonymous

    I am a Hulu Plus user, but if this change occurs, I will cancel my subscription and go to other websites and Amazon to watch episodes I don’t want to wait for to show up on Netflix.  If this change occurs they will lose my business, and I can’t be the only one who feels this way.

  • Anonymous

    It sounds like Hulu is thinking of other ways to add more content. I think if you have cable services with Hulu they probably will allow more shows on there. I have Dish for my provider and I personally always use Dish Online when I want to watch a show on my laptop or catch up on something. With the Dish Online you can get tons of free content on their, and with a subscription you can access even more content. A co-worker at Dish told me about Dish Online during my last travel and I absolutely love it! There are other ways that are legal to find free content.

  • Anonymous

    like Adam said I’m in shock that a single mom can get paid $4117 in 1 month on the computer. have you seen this link ===>>http://must2visit.blogspot.com 

  • JENNIE Foster

    You’ll already have to have a cable television subscription in order to use the service.

  • Polly McCall

    Uh – no you don’t.  I don’t have cable and I do have Hulu Plus – that’s the whole point.  A lot of us don’t want to pay for cable, but don’t mind paying 7.99 for Hulu Plus

  • Polly McCall

    Sorry – I misread your post.  

  • http://www.fangirlconfessions.com Robin Burks

    Yeah, and then they’ll be wondering why piracy numbers are going up. Because that’s exactly what will happen. Morons.

  • http://profile.yahoo.com/CXFJVZGSOKFJAI2KXL6UWYTC5Y AMB82470

    I THINK THIS IS BS I PURPOSELY CANCELLED MY CABLE CAUSE I PAY FOR HULU+ NOW I HAVE TO HAVE THE CABLE TELEVISION TO WATCH HULU HELL THERE’S NOTHING ON BASIC LIMITED CABLE AND I PAY FOR INTERNET SO I CAN WATCH WHAT I WANT AND CABLE TELEVISION HAS BECOME ENTIRELY TOO EXPENSIVE AND NOW THIS, WTF…???

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000504026444 Joe Black

    For the last 12 months, I have NOT been paying $189 to the cable company and Hulu Plus isn’t the only place to get the programming I watch. If they go to the authentication platform, they will lose me too.

  • Nick Shaffer

    Look guys, and girls, they have EVERY right to restrict their content based on stupid premises. And I have every right to cancel the service, and go back to Torrents :) then nobody gets paid, and I still get my tv shows. So go ahead Hulu…call my bluff

  • Anonymous

    Hulu was an experiment by the networks. It doesn’t make money in the whole scheme of things. The networks are experimenting to try to find a way to make it profitable. but the truth of the matter is that it will never be profitable. So why continue it? Why continue something that isn’t worth doing? If you paid $100 of gas everyday to make $101 at work, would you keep working? If Hulu doesn’t make financial sense, they will eventually close. This is simply the first step in that direction.

    And threatening to go to torrent is ridiulous, too. It’s like saying, if I can’t buy my favoite candy bar for a dollar, i’m gonna go steal it. Well, if enough people do this, the candy bar store won’t keep selling it. In fact, this is really how many stores work. Highly shoplifted items are pulled if they aren’t profitable for a store.

    A company needs to charge what it costs to keep creating great shows. If you steal them, then they will disappear. When Napster was created, I tried not to download the free stuff, because my payment was my way of showing the artist that I appreciated his or her music. Stealing from them doesn’t help them.

    When you spend $80 a month on cable, you as a viewer vote for what you like. Only $5 to $10 of what you pay is profit. Let’s say 100,000 people tune in for a show, the show gets $10 per viewer, which provides the show with a $1 million budget. But lets say people that like this show all use torrent. The budget of the show is cut to $500k, the show isn’t as good because it can’t hire the good writers or special effects people or stuntmen on whatever, and the program gets pulled.

    Anyway, I don’t mean to sound so negative, but seriously, cable subscriptions of $80 per month pays for a lot of programming. If everybody was on hulu, we wouldn’t see the quality of shows that we are getting right now. I’m not sure what the networks were thinking supporting hulu in the first place.

  • Anonymous

    With 420 million in ad revenue, they couldn’t make a profit?

  • Anonymous

    When cable started out, they were promising ad-free TV. Broadcast channels operate on ad revenues. One or the other makes sense.

  • Anonymous

    I was amazed when Comcast’s purchase of NBC went through. That constituted a vertical monopoly with regard to NBC content. Cable companies should be like public utilities, limited to supplying infrastructure and no content. In the early days of TV, broadcasters relied on ad revenue. I guess everybody in the entertainment business doesn’t want to pull in their belt for the recession, and prefer to screw the consumers. Greed is pervasive in America, from welfare-cheats to system-gamers to speculators to corporate execs. No one has any shame any more (progressive therapists told us shame and guilt were “bad.”) We could use a lot more shame and guilt today.

  • EZ

    Agreed. Television content acquired by the cable networks is paid for by advertisers. The fact that they force us to subscribe and pay for cable is extra money for them. The loss of revenue from customers cutting their cable and moving to streaming was somewhat (if not entirely) reimbursed through ad revenue acquired through Hulu. The truth is, the cable companies are just greedy and not future thinking at all.

  • EZ

    It’s not and never was free. You, as the HULU viewer, are being advertised to. That is paying HULU’s bills, even as a viewer that does not subscribe to HULU plus.

  • Ray

    This is a travesty. What they are doing will force some if not most of us pay for the same content two to three times. We already have to pay are internet provider for the bandwidth as pretty much every provider has a limit that when you go over you have to pay extra. Now they are saying we will have to pay a cable provider. I was also considering Hulu Plus if they would get more of their own content, such as I would love to see them negotiate a deal to buy and air season 2 of The Event exclusively. In other words this would mean pay for internet, cable, and Hulu Plus fees. Three fees to watch the same content. Sound Fair?

  • Shawneda Marks

    I used to work for Comcast they make WAY WAY WAY more than $10 a month profit from the cable subscription.

  • http://twitter.com/NeedsMusts NeedsMusts

    The problem isn’t just that we resent paying so much for TV content. It’s also the way the cable companies package channels and bundle additional products. Then, there are the little fees that add up too. And no one wants to take responsibility for rising costs. If you want a land line even though they are going out of fashion: $40. If you want that number to be an unpublished number (That’s $4.95 per month extra). Special deals on calls? More money. And you can’t just get Basic cable, there’s the equipment needed for the great reception. Plus HBO? Well, you can’t just JUMP to a channel like HBO. First, you need an extended package. It’s the Value-for-Money issue all over again. Networks, your TV may be good, but it isn’t worth $200 a month. I’m not buying the DVDs on top of that too! As someone who has used Comcast and Verizon in the past, their Customer Service would ruin the experience even if the price and content were flawless. If the networks don’t want viewers taking advantage of them with cable-cutting, streaming, and/or piracy; then, STOP taking advantage of us viewers. NBC may not be Comcast but they aren’t ignorant of the process either.

  • http://www.facebook.com/push9monkeys Cassie S Walker

    For the last freakin’ time! Piracy is not stealing. It’s making a copy!! So using torrents is like making a copy of a cd for your best friend. You still have the copy, but now there’s a duplicate. Someone has to buy the original copy in order to make a torrent file to upload so that you can download it.
    Ex:
    http://cdn.iwastesomuchtime.com/December-23-2011-19-02-45-1198043700bv1.jpg

  • Anonymous

    This is why most towns are now using their municipals to build a fiber hub. Pretty soon all these cable companies will be useless anyway. Their days are limited. In our town, our local government is going to start providing the highest speed cable to use and its going to cost LESS than i pay now for my lowest tier service 20g. This includes internet phone, 100 g internet, and cable. This is just pure greed.

  • http://www.facebook.com/Punkin2x74 Danielle Drugge Sprague

    Yes it is stealing. If you make a copy for your best friend and they don’t pay for the cd its not paying for it therefor its stealing. I’d like to see you stand up in court against the copyright laws with that logic. You’d be paying a $250, 000.00 fine just so they could make an example of you!

  • http://www.facebook.com/Punkin2x74 Danielle Drugge Sprague

    Not too sure how it plays in the anti-trust field. However, Comcast.com is doing exactly what hulu is thinking about doing. If you have any type of comcast account be it phone tv or internet you can watch your local shows online without having a subscription like abc, nbc, cw, fox. But if you want to watch something on A&e or spiketv you have to have a cable subscription.

  • Anonymous

    I’ve been running into crap on the already crappy You Tube. I think they’re sabotaging the videos to eventually force people to subscribe to a “Premium” channel. I wi-fi on the equally crappy “Smart” Riverside wi-fi becuase of getting ripped off by three consecutive Internet companies ending with AT&T. Every time I think of these scum, and I mean every time, I wonder why terroists hit innocent civilians instead of the blood-sucking extortionists who are the corporate scum who rip us off on a daily basis. It’s not bad enough we have a political class that no longer “represents” those who vote them into office. It’s not bad enough that every aspect of our lives is either taxed, fined, levied or otherwise over-regulated. Nope. We have to take it in the ass from companies like AT&T who instruct their salespeople to lie to you and when you cancel their service because it’s DOUBLE what you were told they’ll send you to collection agencies like they did me and ruin your credit. If that doesn’t deserve the death penalty I don’t know what does. Incidently one of my favorite books is “Term Limits” by Vince Flynn. Everybody should read these three articles.

    “It’s Time to Break Up AT&T, Verizon, Comcast, Time Warner and the Rest of the Telecoms.” AlterNet / By David Rosen and Bruce Kushnick
    Today’s telecoms provide overpriced and inferior service, and are systematically overcharging the hapless American consumer.
    http://www.alternet.org/news/150752/it's_time_to_break_up_at%26t,%C2%A0verizon,_comcast,_time_warner_and_the_rest_of_the_telecoms/

    “How the Phone Companies Are Screwing America: The $320 Billion Broadband Rip-Off” AlterNet / By David Rosen and Bruce Kushnick
    Americans are stuck with an inferior and overpriced communications system, compared with the rest of the world, and we’re being ripped off in the process.
    http://www.alternet.org/story/148397/how_the_phone_companies_are_screwing_america:_the_$320_billion_broadband_rip-off?page=entire

    Bank of America: Too Crooked to Fail Rolling Stone Magazine / by Matt Taibbi
    The bank has defrauded everyone from investors and insurers to homeowners and the unemployed. So why does the government keep bailing it out?
    http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/bank-of-america-too-crooked-to-fail-20120314

    And books:

    Taken Into Custody: The War Against Fathers, Marriage and the Family by Stephen Baskerville
    The War Against Boys: How Misguided Feminism Is Harming Our Young Men by Christina Hoff Sommers
    Purple Heart’s Final Beat – A Soldier Suicide Story
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0_StCzStBy0

    Plunder: How Public Employee Unions Are Raiding Treasuries, Controlling Our Lives and Bankrupting the Nation by Steven Greenhut
    One Nation Under Arrest: How Crazy Laws, Rogue Prosecutors and Activist Judges Threaten You Liberty by Reosenzweig & Walsh
    Mean Justice: A true account of a prosecutor’s power and betrayel by Edward Humes
    The Man by Irving Wallace (The “Black” President we should have had.)
    Snitch: Informants, Cooperators & the Corruption of Justice by Ethan Brown
    The Innocent Man by John Grisham
    Until Proven Innocent: Political Correctness and the Shameful Injustices of the Duke Lacrosse Rape Case by Stuart Taylor Jr. and KC Johnson
    Vince Flynn’s “Term Limits” as a solution to our political problems.

  • Anonymous

    “It’s Time to Break Up AT&T, Verizon, Comcast, Time Warner and the Rest of the Telecoms.” AlterNet / By David Rosen and Bruce Kushnick
    Today’s telecoms provide overpriced and inferior service, and are systematically overcharging the hapless American consumer.
    http://www.alternet.org/news/150752/it's_time_to_break_up_at%26t,%C2%A0verizon,_comcast,_time_warner_and_the_rest_of_the_telecoms/
    “How the Phone Companies Are Screwing America: The $320 Billion Broadband Rip-Off” AlterNet / By David Rosen and Bruce Kushnick
    Americans are stuck with an inferior and overpriced communications system, compared with the rest of the world, and we’re being ripped off in the process.
    http://www.alternet.org/story/148397/how_the_phone_companies_are_screwing_america:_the_$320_billion_broadband_rip-off?page=entire
    Bank of America: Too Crooked to Fail Rolling Stone Magazine / by Matt Taibbi
    The bank has defrauded everyone from investors and insurers to homeowners and the unemployed. So why does the government keep bailing it out?
    http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/bank-of-america-too-crooked-to-fail-20120314
    Taken Into Custody: The War Against Fathers, Marriage and the Family by Stephen Baskerville
    The War Against Boys: How Misguided Feminism Is Harming Our Young Men by Christina Hoff Sommers
    Purple Heart’s Final Beat – A Soldier Suicide Story
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0_StCzStBy0
    Plunder: How Public Employee Unions Are Raiding Treasuries, Controlling Our Lives and Bankrupting the Nation by Steven Greenhut
    One Nation Under Arrest: How Crazy Laws, Rogue Prosecutors and Activist Judges Threaten You Liberty by Reosenzweig & Walsh
    Mean Justice: A true account of a prosecutor’s power and betrayel by Edward Humes
    The Man by Irving Wallace (The “Black” President we should have had.)
    Snitch: Informants, Cooperators & the Corruption of Justice by Ethan Brown
    The Innocent Man by John Grisham
    Until Proven Innocent: Political Correctness and the Shameful Injustices of the Duke Lacrosse Rape Case by Stuart Taylor Jr. and KC Johnson
    Vince Flynn’s “Term Limits” as a solution to our political problems.

  • Guest

    I don’t see a point in paying for it either..Got me some special cables from Best B. Are they legal and will computers keep making a port for them?

  • Joseph Snodgrass

    hulu should be sued for some content they have