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What's with the name?

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What Boys Think of Girls

The Mythbusters Ask, Is “Throw Like A Girl” An Insult? [VIDEO]


Interesting. Interesting.

(via tipster Abigail)

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  • Anonymous

    I love you Mythbusters. I love you so hard.

  • http://anna.balasi.com/ AnnaB

    They are so awesome. I love it.

  • Sanjay Merchant

    As cool as this is, didn’t this episode come out a while ago?

  • Anonymous

    I’m not a baseball person but I saw “A League of their Own”. I always understood that the insult “throw like a girl” meant “throw like a person with no training”, not “a woman can never throw well, even if she trains”. Is it still sexist? Definitely, but as this video proves again, women likes certain sports in lesser numbers than men.

    Still, it was nice to find out with mocap that the throwing motion for both sexes is pretty much identical.

  • Calum Syers

    I was thinking that, too. I’m fairly sure this episode was released months ago.

  • Anonymous

    huh. When I grew up, throwing like a girl meant underhand throwing (as opposed to overhand.)
    (edited to fix the two kinds of throw, because reasons)

  • Anonymous

    Do they? I think that’s another question to ask about our culture. I loved playing catch with my grandfather when I was little, but when it came time to sign me up for activities, my parents put me in dance and figure skating. When softball was mentioned, I was told that it was masculine and that I was too much of a girly girl. Yeah, I eventually excelled in ballet and modern dance. Almost went to college for it. But maybe I would’ve been just as good and loved softball just as much if it weren’t for the way people are socialized when it comes to women and sports. And if professional women’s teams got the same playtime and attention as men.

  • Laura Truxillo

    ” Definitely, but as this video proves again, women likes certain sports in lesser numbers than men.”

    Eh, that seems a fuzzy claim. Pretty much right up there with saying “women are less interested in math and science than men.” It’s not something hardwired into DNA, it’s a cultural thing. The boy is more likely to get Legos and erector sets and footballs for Christmas. The boys are all encouraged to play certain sports; girls are discouraged from taking up, say, football. Now they’ll be gung-ho about volley-ball and soccer, because American society tells us those are “girl sports.” I mean, for pity’s sake, girls aren’t even *allowed* to play baseball–just softball.

    Video doesn’t prove nothing,

  • http://www.thenerdybird.com/ Jill Pantozzi

    Yes, it’s from a show this past summer but we just saw it for the first time yesterday. Plus, it’s just a good video. :)

  • http://www.thenerdybird.com/ Jill Pantozzi

    “Definitely, but as this video proves again, women likes certain sports in lesser numbers than men.”

    It doesn’t prove this at all. It might prove that parents are less willing to let their daughters train in certain sports because of traditional gender roles though.

  • Margaret

    Exactly. My hometown only had little league and didn’t create a softball league until 2000. A lot of parents didn’t want their girls playing little league and there was no other outlet for them. Once the softball league was created there were plenty of girls interested in throwing and catching. And if you look at things before Title IX, there were almost no sports for women to participate in. I feel like we’re still catching up from all of that.

  • Anonymous

    I never went as far as to explain why women likes certain sports less than men. If it’s because they are actively discouraged at playing those sports or, as you say, they are pretty much forbidden to play that sport, it’s not their fault and it’s unfair. It also gives us a society where more men likes baseball than women.

  • Anonymous

    Like I wrote to Laura Truxillo, I never said why women were less interested in certain sports, just that they were. Traditional gender roles imposed on young girls definitely plays a part in that reality.

  • Laura Truxillo

    But that’s just it. Girls AREN’T less interested in sports. They’re MADE to be less interested in sports.

    Maybe that’s not what you meant. In which case, you need to amend your words and maybe not phrase it like that in the future. Because even if you, personally, didn’t mean anything by it, the language of “Girls aren’t interested in _______” or “Girls don’t want ______” is the sort of thing that has been used for decades (at least) to justify not making it available to girls.

    Straight up, almost any girl who was discouraged from pursuing an activity thought to be masculine was told those exact words. Not merely, “You don’t want to do that” or “why don’t you do this instead.” But “Girls don’t play football.” “Girls don’t like math.” “Girls aren’t interested in sports.”

    It’s the statement itself that’s insidious, because it’s used as a justification and it becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy. Cheers if you didn’t mean that, but language doesn’t exist in a vacuum, and I think most women here are pretty well and done with hearing “girls aren’t interested in ______.”

    Because there are plenty of girls who ARE. They’re not anomalies or outliers. They don’t all want to fight the uphill battle of the tough tomboy who’s one of the guys. They’re just girls. And they’re interested in sports. Or math. Or science. Or the military.

  • Laura Truxillo

    But that’s just it. Girls AREN’T less interested in sports. They’re MADE to be less interested in sports.

    Maybe that’s not what you meant. In which case, you need to amend your words and maybe not phrase it like that in the future. Because even if you, personally, didn’t mean anything by it, the language of “Girls aren’t interested in _______” or “Girls don’t want ______” is the sort of thing that has been used for decades (at least) to justify not making it available to girls.

    Straight up, almost any girl who was discouraged from pursuing an activity thought to be masculine was told those exact words. Not merely, “You don’t want to do that” or “why don’t you do this instead.” But “Girls don’t play football.” “Girls don’t like math.” “Girls aren’t interested in sports.”

    It’s the statement itself that’s insidious, because it’s used as a justification and it becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy. Cheers if you didn’t mean that, but language doesn’t exist in a vacuum, and I think most women here are pretty well and done with hearing “girls aren’t interested in ______.”

    Because there are plenty of girls who ARE. They’re not anomalies or outliers. They don’t all want to fight the uphill battle of the tough tomboy who’s one of the guys. They’re just girls. And they’re interested in sports. Or math. Or science. Or the military.

  • Anonymous

    I’m sorry that’s what you thought I was saying. To me, “made to be less interested in SOME (important word) sports” wasn’t such an important distinction because in the end, it means that there is less women liking baseball just the same.

    Still, this is no longer a discussion about sports and women but a discussion about the words I used. English is not my first language and it’s probably yours. Also, other people agree with you and I haven’t seen anyone else making my argument. All evidence points to me being wrong, so I must humbly apologize. I will change my OP to “made to be less” because it still says what I meant and is less confusing.

  • Laura Truxillo

    Ah, well. Understandable then. Mastering the rules of another language is hard enough, getting the idioms is even harder, and catching the history behind seemingly-innocent phrases is a headache in any language.

    (Pro-tip: never say “you people.” Learned that the hard way when I was younger.)

  • Camille Monae

    They weren’t collecting data on speed. If you watch the video they measured speed, accuracy and form. So, they are right. Also, the softballs i have thrown are much larger than the balls the males use. so there is going to be a difference there as well.

  • Camille Monae

    Am I the only one who watched the female pitcher multiple times. Something about her form is just gorgeous. I miss playing softball.

  • http://ptwor.com/ Jay Salinas

    The female pitcher makes that 65mph look effortless. I think the guy’s larger frame has nothing to do with his pitches having greater speed though. Nolan Ryan was like half that guy’s size and was throwing constant 90+ mph pitches. It’s all about form. And for any of those amateurs that want to throw a faster ball with a bit less practice; buy some tennis balls, fill them with bb-pellets, close it off with duct tape and toss the ball up in the air alternating your catches with each hand. Do that for about ten minutes, maybe less, and a baseball will feel as light as a tennis ball. And just as easy to throw.